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Overcoming Children’s Genetic Risk for Externalizing Disorders — Parts 1, 2, 3, 4

$100.00 $90.00

Specific parenting strategies may help children at risk for developing disorders such as ADHD and conduct disorder, and as adults, psychopathy. Teach your clients how to help their children develop the ability to love, impulse control and moral reasoning.

Part 1: Externalizing disorders of childhood and adulthood, including ADHD, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy

Part 2: What genetic research says about behavior and the risk of developing externalizing disorders

Part 3: How the environment, including parenting, siblings and peers, affects the development of externalizing disorders in children

Part 4: Brain systems, social learning, and using the Inner Triangle to immunize children against externalizing disorders

Description

Specific parenting strategies may help children at risk for developing disorders such as ADHD and conduct disorder, and as adults, psychopathy. Teach your clients how to help their children develop the ability to love, impulse control and moral reasoning.

This course offers four continuing education credits for mental health professionals. All four parts must be completed to receive credit.

Part 1: Externalizing disorders of childhood and adulthood, including ADHD, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy

Learning objectives:

  • Name and describe externalizing disorders of childhood and adolescence, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and substance use disorders.
  • Compare the diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy.
  • Describe human social behavioral systems and how they develop.
  • Describe the impact of parental externalizing disorders on co-parents and children.
  • Identify the risks to children of exposure to psychopathic parents.
  • More info

Part 2: What genetic research says about behavior and the risk of developing externalizing disorders

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the development of externalizing behavior in children and young adults.
  • Discuss how to interpret the results of genetic studies.
  • Describe the results of studies of genetic risk for externalizing disorders.
  • Explain phenotypic traits and personality traits associated with externalizing disorders.
  • Identify guidelines for talking to clients about genetic risk for externalizing disorders.
  • More info

Part 3: How the environment, including parenting, siblings and peers, affects the development of externalizing disorders in children

Learning objectives:

  • Discuss environmental factors that influence the development of the externalizing phenotype in children and young adults.
  • Explain the interaction between genetic and environmental effects in the development of externalizing disorders in children and young adults.
  • Explain how parenting behavior influences the development of externalizing disorders in at-risk children and young adults.
  • Discuss how genes affect the choices that at-risk children and young adults make in affiliating with peers, and how those choices impact the development of externalizing disorders.
  • Assess environmental and genetic risk in at-risk children.
  • More info

Part 4: Brain systems, social learning, and using the Inner Triangle to immunize children against externalizing disorders

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the two brain systems that mediate behavior.
  • Discuss three methods that children use to learn from adults.
  • Use three core child development concepts to explain the interaction between genetic and environmental risks for externalizing disorders.
  • Describe how teen substance use enhances risk for future substance dependence.
  • Summarize how to teach parents to mitigate the risk of a child developing an externalizing disorder.
  • More info

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